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  1. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    532

    Re: clamming in bodega

    From the early 1800's to the early 1900's (about 100 years) the largest industry along bodega bay was a shipyard and taneries (not very clean industries). During that time the average life of a ship was only 3-5 years due to the poor quality of the wood and the dificulty to cure the wood. After 3-5 years the ships were then broken in the bay and repurposed.

    It has also been a fishing outpost for the last 200+ years. When a bay is used for that long for ship berthing the sediment will surely become tainted. The chromium comes from a long history of many many boats using toxic antifouling paints and ablative paints before they were outlawed.

  2. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    324

    Re: clamming in bodega

    [quote author=abdiver12 link=1197339109/0#5 date=1197493549]You need to get a 3 foot high x 2 ft wide pvc pipe to shove in the hole or when you dig, the sand will keep caving in on you. *And you have to dig deep for the big clams then reach in the hole as far as you can to feel for the neck. *Look for the biggest air holes in the sand when choosing a spot, they indicate the largest clams.

    Are you sure the diameter of the PVC tube should be 2 feet? Isn't that too wide?

    Thanks,
    Brat Popper *

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    527

    Re: clamming in bodega

    Quote Originally Posted by Allen
    Isn't hexavalent chrome from TCE ?

    Allen
    Nope. Apples and Aardvarks. Hex chrom is the toxic metal compound made famous in the Erin Brokovich movie....a (hazardous) sister of regular chromium. TCE is an organic solvent. I've seen sites with both, but only where they were both used and spilled.

    I'd also be interested in the meaning of ship breaking, and why Bodega has hex. chrom. in the sediment.....

  4. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    389

    Re: clamming in bodega

    So what is ship breaking, and what is the source of hexavalent chrome? Isn't hexavalent chrome from TCE ?

    Allen

  5. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    226

    Re: clamming in bodega

    well about clams you should thank them for creating such a clean bay in the bay area, supposedly china clams indegiouns creatures that got here from ballast water on a big vessel, has no known enemy's so their population is huge, their for those axact clams filter all the bays water in about a 24 hour period you may not want to eat them, but they do wonders for your bay.

  6. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    273

    Re: clamming in bodega

    Quote Originally Posted by sethonious
    Since ship breaking was such a huge part of the bodega industry I would not want to eat any clams from the bodega proper area. There are a lot of toxins in the sand there. I would head elsewhere to find clams.
    Where are you getting your information about ship breaking?

    I would be more concerned about levels of marine mammal excrement. Every so often, they have to shut down Campbell Cove because of the level of contamination.

  7. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    532

    Re: clamming in bodega

    So sunrise chaser doesn't think my advice is any good, but there are very high levels of hexavalent chromium in bodega. You could not pay me any sum of money to eat any filter feeders that come out of that mud. Dbass seems to agree with me, but hey it is your health. If you want to follow sunrise chaser's advice... go for it. I am just an environmental scientist, what do I know?

    There are safer places to dig clams.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    841

    Re: clamming in bodega

    Looks like Lawson's *
    Quote Originally Posted by abdiver12
    You need to get a 3 foot high x 2 ft wide pvc pipe to shove in the hole or when you dig, the sand will keep caving in on you. *And you have to dig deep for the big clams then reach in the hole as far as you can to feel for the neck. *Look for the biggest air holes in the sand when choosing a spot, they indicate the largest clams. *Here's some photos that illustrate the process:



    Be prepared to get muddy and wet (note the expression on his face)! *You can just make out the pvc pipe under his shirt.



    What you should end up with - a nice fat horseneck clam.

  9. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    841

    Re: clamming in bodega

    The bay water doesn't really move out very much at tide change, I would never recommend eating anything for inside the bay, diesel spills, sewer spill and who knows what they don't tell. There's a $hit load @ Elkhorn landing near Moss Landing, I wouldn't eat those either (because of th PCB contamination. I would do Tomales for clams. I would not just try for the old Clams the medium younger clams are always better eating..(safer).. to!

  10. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    486

    Re: clamming in bodega

    You need to get a 3 foot high x 2 ft wide pvc pipe to shove in the hole or when you dig, the sand will keep caving in on you. *And you have to dig deep for the big clams then reach in the hole as far as you can to feel for the neck. *Look for the biggest air holes in the sand when choosing a spot, they indicate the largest clams. *Here's some photos that illustrate the process:



    Be prepared to get muddy and wet (note the expression on his face)! *You can just make out the pvc pipe under his shirt.



    What you should end up with - a nice fat horseneck clam.

 

 
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