Halibut Information
Halibut
Halibut General Information

Pacific Halibut reside on the continental shelf of the North Pacific. Their range extends from Santa Barbara, California north to Nome, Alaska around the Pacific south to Hokkaido, Japan. In the east Pacific they are more common from the California/Oregon border north.

Pacific Halibut prefer water temperatures between 37 to 47 degrees F. They are bottom dwellers that have been caught a deep as 3600 feet but most are taken during the summer at depths ranging from 100 to 900 feet.

Pacific halibut move seasonally from deep water at the edge of the continental shelf to shallower coastal waters during the summer and then back to deeper water during the winter. The migration corresponds to winter spawning and summer feeding and often covers great distances.

Males mature at 8 years and females at 12 years. The average Pacific halibut caught is 42" long weighing about 30 pounds. The largest Pacific halibut caught on record was over 500 pounds. Mature fish congregate at the edge continental shelf to spawn between November and March at depths from 600 to 15,000 feet.

A 250 pound female may produce 4 million eggs which are fertilized externally. The free floating eggs hatch in about two weeks. The eggs and larvae, heavier than surface water, drift freely in deep ocean currents. They slowly drift to shallower waters on the continental shelf. After about 6 months the larvae settle to the ocean floor and take on the flatfish form.

Recent Halibut Articles & Reports

Yellow, Gold And Bottom Brown

Written By: Bill Roecker,
July 13, 2014

Backtracking briefly to yesterday’s story about the yellowtail bite we experienced on The 13 Spot at the top of The Ridge, I’d like to point out that skipper Billy Santiago Jr.’s parking job put us exactly on top of frantically biting...

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Shore Fishing Enthusiasts Battle Stripers And Halibut

Written By: Roland Aspiras,
July 12, 2014

Interest remains high for striped bass and halibut in the city, while others search out perch and crab.

Anglers tossing lures were catching halibut and a few striped bass along various piers, according to Stephanie Scott at Gus' Discount...

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Rockfish And Lingcod Dominate Recent Catches

Written By: Cal Kellogg,
July 11, 2014

There are stripers, halibut and salmon available for East Bay charter boat anglers, but the action for these species has been up and down. The most consistent bite is coming from rockfish and lingcod.

Captain James Smith of California...

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Tips & Tactics for Halibut
Targeting S.F. Bay Halibut With Live Bait

Targeting S.F. Bay Halibut With Live Bait

Written By: Cal Kellogg

After an absence of a couple years, big numbers of halibut are once again holding within the confines of San Francisco Bay. With live bait...

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Halibut: You Know How To Eat Them, This Is How To Catch Them!

Halibut: You Know How To Eat Them, This Is How To Catch Them!

Written By: Cal Kellogg

Ask Bay Area saltwater enthusiasts what their favorite gamefish is and you’ll get several different answers. Some guys will point to the...

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Anchovy, I Love You!

Anchovy, I Love You!

Written By: Cal Kellogg

Just the other day I found myself setting on a deer stand on a ridge high in the Tahoe National Forest. The hunting was great except for...

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Halibut Locations

Halibut Locations


Recent Reader's Photo
Nile
Caught by:

Nile

on:
Species: Halibut

Nile, hooked up on this 75lb Halibut fishing for Lings & Snapper aboard the BillweeNiloKiki in the ocean out of the Rogue River. Thanks Larry of Lex's Landing

Halibut Videos

Presented by Angler West TV

Big Halibut On A Jig!

Presented by Angler West TV

Winter Harbour 2012. Halibut, Lingcod & Salmon.


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